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Anethum graveolens is often confused with:
Foeniculum vulgare Foeniculum vulgare
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Ocimum basilicum Ocimum basilicum
Salvia rosmarinus Rosmarinus officinalis
Beta vulgaris (Leaf Beet Group) Beta vulgaris (Leaf Beet Group)
Anethum graveolens has some common insect problems:
Aphids Found on Flowers and Foliage
Anethum graveolens has some common disease problems:
Phytophthora Blight and Root Rot on Annuals and Herbaceous Perennials

Indian Dill Anethum graveolens

Other Common Name(s):

Previously known as:

  • Anethum sowa
  • Peucedanum graveolens
Phonetic Spelling
ah-NEE-thum grav-ee-OH-lens
Description

Anethum graveolens, or Dill, is an aromatic self-seeding annual herb. The genus name, Anethum, comes from the Greek meaning to calm or soothe while the species name, graveolens, means emitting a heavy odor or strong smelling. Dill is believed to have originated in the Mediterranean and has a long history of use as a culinary and medicinal herb and was believed to aid digestion.

For the most productive yield and strongest stems, dill grows best in temperate climates with full sun in well-drained, slightly acidic soil. Plant dill seeds in early spring, a week or two before the last hard frost date, about ¼ inches deep as they need light to germinate. Plant every 2 or 4 weeks to keep it ready for fresh use. Seedlings germinate in about 10 to 14 days. Because of its long taproot, dill is a poor candidate for transplant. Dill plants can survive low temperatures but grow best in temperatures of about 70 degrees. Consistent watering is best and prevents the plant from  bolting; however, plants that get too much water or extra shade can be lanky and flop over requiring support and the plants should be protected from strong winds. The dill seed is harvested after the stems begin drying out; the seeds turn golden brown in color, and the seed clusters gain weight. Dill resembles fennel and can be distinguished by its smell and hollow stems.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Blight and aster yellows can cause significant damage. Dill is susceptible to aphids, tomato horn worms, and powdery mildew. If planted too close to a carrot crop, it can reduce yield; however, it is a good companion plant for cucumber and broccoli.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Vegetable Garden and Pollinator Plants
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Bouquet'
    tall, early-producing variety with large seed heads
  • 'Delikat'
    has dense foliage for high yields
  • 'Fernleaf'
    slowest to bolt, dwarf dill for containers and small spaces
  • 'Hera'
    bunching dill slower to bolt than many varieties
  • 'Long Island Mammoth'
    tall variety often used for pickling
'Bouquet', 'Delikat', 'Fernleaf', 'Hera', 'Long Island Mammoth'
Tags:
#sun#full sun#partial shade#annual#edible plant#acidic soil#herb garden#edible garden#annual herb#non-toxic for horses#non-toxic for dogs#non-toxic for cats
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
  • 'Bouquet'
    tall, early-producing variety with large seed heads
  • 'Delikat'
    has dense foliage for high yields
  • 'Fernleaf'
    slowest to bolt, dwarf dill for containers and small spaces
  • 'Hera'
    bunching dill slower to bolt than many varieties
  • 'Long Island Mammoth'
    tall variety often used for pickling
'Bouquet', 'Delikat', 'Fernleaf', 'Hera', 'Long Island Mammoth'
Tags:
#sun#full sun#partial shade#annual#edible plant#acidic soil#herb garden#edible garden#annual herb#non-toxic for horses#non-toxic for dogs#non-toxic for cats
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Anethum
    Species:
    graveolens
    Family:
    Apiaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Herb that is used in food; flowers in crafts. Used since ancient Egyptian times as a culinary and medicinal herb to aid in digestion and gastronic health. The essential oils are believed to have antimicrobial, antifungal and antioxidant properties often used in soaps. It has been historically been used for magical purposes (love potions, spells). This plant is also popular for ornamental displays and gardens.
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Mediterranean, southern Russia, northern and western Africa
    Distribution:
    Naturalized throughout much of the world.
    Wildlife Value:
    Larval host to the black swallowtail butterfly. Attracts beneficial insects such as bees, wasps, hover flies and butterflies.
    Edibility:
    Leaves (dill weed), seeds, and flowers are edible (used in teas, pickling, and as culinary seasoning). Dill herb and dill seed oils are steam-distilled and used by the food industry as seasonings. Add to pickles, mince in butter, and cook with salmon, borscht, fish, and soups. Dill can be used in teas and as seasoning for butter, cakes, bread, vinegars, soups, fish, pickles, salads, etc.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 2 ft. 6 in. - 5 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 2 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Annual
    Edible
    Herb
    Habit/Form:
    Ascending
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Low
    Texture:
    Fine
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Sand
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Neutral (6.0-8.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    12 inches-3 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Green
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Fragrant
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Fall
    Spring
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Schizocarp
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Dill fruits are oval, compressed with ridges and progress from bright green color to dark brown with age. They have a pleasant aromatic odor.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Gold/Yellow
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Fragrant
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Summer
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    Fragrant yellow flowers are produced terminally in midsummer and produce seeds 3 to 4 weeks later. Flowers containing 5 petals are arrayed in a spiral around the inflorescence axis. Flowers have an herbal flavor.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Soft
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Fragrant
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Filiform
    Linear
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    Aromatic blue-green foliage have a delicate fern-like appearance. Leaves are compound and made up of two or more discrete leaflets. The underside of the leaf is not hairy or has few hairs. Leaves are highly aromatic when crushed and usually have the best flavor when the flowers first open. Young leaves contain the most aromatic oils, thus produce the biggest flavor.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Surface:
    Smooth (glabrous)
    Stem Description:
    The stem is erect, branched and hollow. The branching stems have white to off-white vertical striations that run down the length of the stem. Taller plants may need protection from strong winds to keep them upright.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Small Space
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Edible Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Design Feature:
    Border
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Hummingbirds
    Pollinators
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer