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Galerina autumnalis

Previously known as:

  • Galerina marginata
Phonetic Spelling
gah-ler-EE-nah aw-tum-NAH-lis
This plant has high severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

The small brown sticky caps, white annulus, rusty brown spore prints and occurrence on rotted wood are good diagnostic characteristics of this mushroom. Its cap is small with a diameter of 2/3 to 1.5 inches.  This species is one of a complex that is best separated by an expert.  G. autumnalis, G. oregonensis, G. unicolor, and G. venenata were once thought of as separate species from Galerina marginata, but are now known to be the same species.  Regardless, this is one of North Carolina's most poisonous mushrooms.

Quick ID:

  • Cap: Small, about 1.5-2.5 in. in diameter, sticky when moist, dark brown to brownish yellow as it dries, margin striate when wet.
  • Gills: Attached to the top of the stalk, yellow becoming brown as spores develop.
  • Stalk: Light brown to tan, fibrillose below annulus, hollow, base with dense white mycelium.
  • Annulus: White becoming brown with spore deposit, located near the top of the stalk, may disappear with age.
  • Spore Print: Rusty brown.
See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#mushroom#poisonous mushrooms#woodlands
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#poisonous#mushroom#poisonous mushrooms#woodlands
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Galerina
    Species:
    autumnalis
    Family:
    Strophariaceae
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    US
    Distribution:
    Apparently well distributed throughout NC
    Edibility:
    NOT EDIBLE! See poison information for details.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Mushroom
    Poisonous
  • Leaves:
    Hairs Present:
    No
  • Stem:
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Naturalized Area
    Woodland
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    High
    Poison Symptoms:
    HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN! Symptoms may occur 6-24 hours after eating and include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea which may persist 6-9 hours. Initial symptoms are frequently followed by a lag period up to 24 hours. During this symptomless period, toxins are severely affecting the liver resulting in gastrointestinal bleeding, coma, kidney failure and death usually within 7 days after eating.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Amatoxins
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Fruits
    Roots
    Sap/Juice
    Stems