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Cardamine corymbosa

Common Name(s):

Previously known as:

  • Cardamine corymbosa Hook. f.
Phonetic Spelling
kar-DA-mih-nee kor-rim-BOW-suh
This plant is an invasive species in North Carolina
Description

New Zealand Bittercress is a perennial weed that is a native of New Zealand. It has a widespread distribution in many of the nearby islands. It has been naturalized in Australia, North America, Great Britain, and western Europe. Reportedly, New Zealand Bittercresss was found in a container nursery in Wilkes County, North Carolina. They had received a shipment of plants from a wholesale nursery in Oregon. Most likely, it was a contaminant in a container-grown ornamental plant. 

It is a member of the Brassicaceae or mustard family. The genus name, Cardamine is derived from the Greek word, "Kardamon," and translated means "cress."  The species name, corymbosa, is from the Latin "corymb," which refers to the flower's inflorescence. 

The plant appears wiry and fragile.  It is very small and low growing. The roots are difficult to remove and uproot. Single white flowers appear on upright stems from a basal rosette of bright green leaves. Seedpods arise at the top of the stem and burst open to release the seeds. When found, it is best to remove the plant as soon as possible to prevent further spread.  They can flower and mature in just a few weeks. 

The New Zealand Bittercress is spread via horticultural contaminant. It may be found in naturalized paths, cultivated areas, crevices, ledges, stream banks, forests, and forest margins. It may also be found in lawns, potted plants, and ornamental gardens. It is a costly weed for container nurseries.

 

 

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#invasive#weed#weedy
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#invasive#weed#weedy
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Cardamine
    Species:
    corymbosa
    Family:
    Brassicaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Annual
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Tasmania, New Zealand, Macquarie Islands
    Distribution:
    Native to Antipodean Island, Chatham Island, Macquarie Island, New Zealand North, New Zealand South, and Tasmania. Introduced in Australia, Great Britain, western Europe, and United States--North Carolina and Oregon
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Perennial
    Weed
    Habit/Form:
    Prostrate
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    High
    Texture:
    Coarse
  • Cultural Conditions:
    NC Region:
    Piedmont
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Brown/Copper
    Gold/Yellow
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Fruit Type:
    Siliqua
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    The seedpods emerge from the flower before the petals have dropped. Siliqua is smooth. They appear green, and then at maturity appear purple-brownish color. When they dehisce, tiny light green to light yellow-brown seeds is released.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Corymb
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Fall
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Cross
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    < 1 inch
    Flower Description:
    Small, single, white, four-petaled flowers arise from the stems. They bloom from early spring to fall.
  • Leaves:
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Shape:
    Cordate
    Obtuse
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Width:
    < 1 inch
    Leaf Description:
    The green leaves form a single flat rosette or short lateral branches. They are generally single, egg-shaped leaflet on a long petiole, and occasionally have a pair of smaller leaflets below. The leaves are glabrous to sparsely hairy.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Description:
    The stem for the flower is green and approximately 2-3 inches long.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Hanging Baskets
    Lawn
    Slope/Bank
    Walkways
    Woodland
    Problems:
    Invasive Species
    Weedy