Please submit a search term.

Monarda didyma

Common Name(s):
Bee balm, Bee-balm, Crimson bee-balm
Categories:
Edible Plants, Herbs, Native Plants, Perennials, Wildflowers
Comment:

Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; uses include: teas, flavor jellies, soups, stews, and fruit salads; edible flowers; dried flowers in crafts; bee-balm is native to the North Carolina mountains and may be seen along the Blue Ridge Parkway flowering in summer; unfortunately plants are susceptible to powdery mildew, and may require fungicidal sprays. This plant is resistant to damage by deer.

Season:
Summer to early fall
Light:
Sun, partial shade
Height:
2-5 ft.
Space:
12 to 15 in.
Flower Color:
Red, rose, pink, violet, white
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 4-9
Foliage:
Opposite 3-6 in. dark green, coarsely toothed leaves on square stem
Flower:
Fragrant ragged cluster of red tubular flowers borne on showy heads; reddish bracts
Site:
Rich, moist, acidic soil; stream banks, thickets, ditches
Propagation:
Division in spring, cuttings, seed
Exposure:
full sun to partial shade
Soil:
moist soil
Regions:
Mountains, Piedmont, Coastal Plain
Origin:
Eastern North America, North Carolina
Life Cycle:
Perennial
Tags:
pink, sun, summer, partial shade, purple, herb, wildflower, perennial, hummingbirds, butterflies, fall, pollinators, white, deer resistant, red

NCCES plant id: 409

Monarda didyma Monarda didyma
John Bandauer, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Monarda didyma Monarda didyma
Kerry Woods, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Monarda didyma Monarda didyma
SwamprOse, CC BY-ND-2.0
Monarda didyma Monarda didyma
Patrick Standish, CC BY - 2.0
Monarda didyma Monarda didyma
Bill Barder, CC BY-NC-2.0