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Quercus falcata

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Southern red oak, Water oak
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Trees
Comment:

Quercus falcata, commonly called southern red oak or Spanish oak, is a medium to large deciduous oak that typically matures to 60-80’ tall. It is native from New Jersey to Florida west to southern Illinois, southern Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. It is primarily found growing in upland areas (dry often sandy hills), but is occasionally found in valleys and bottomland areas along rivers. This is an ornamentally attractive oak with a straight trunk and an open rounded crown.

With age the smooth bark becomes  dark in color with broad scaly ridges separated by deep, narrow furrows.   

The hard strong wood is coarse grained and used for general construction, furniture, and fuel.

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmont, Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

     Bloom:  Early Spring    Fruit/Seed/Nut:  Fall

Wildlife Value:  The Southern red oak is moderately resistant to damage by deer. It is a host plant for the Banded Hairstread, Edward's Hairstreak, Grey Hairstreak, White-MouM Hairstreak, Horace's Duskywing, and Juvenal's Duskywing butterflies.  The acorns are eaten by woodpeckers, blue jays, white breasted nuthatches, American crows, small mammals, wild turkey, white-tailed deer and black bear.

Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  Oaks in general are susceptible to a large number of diseases, including oak wilt, chestnut blight, shoestring root rot, anthracnose, oak leaf blister, cankers, leaf spots and powdery mildew. Potential insect pests include scale, oak skeletonizer, leaf miner, galls, oak lace bugs, borers, caterpillars and nut weevils.

Height:
70-90 ft.
Flower:
Insignificant monoecious (having the stamens and the pistils in separate flowers on the same plant.) flowers appear in spring in male catkins (yellowish green) and in female clusters (red tinged). Fruits are small globular acorns (to 1/2” long) that have an orange hairy cap that covers less than 1/3 of the nut. Acorns appear in September-October, but require two growing seasons to mature.
Zones:
7-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
The Southern red oak is best grown in acidic, dry to medium, well-drained loams in full sun. It will tolerate some part shade. Grows well in sandy soils. Tolerates poor soils and drought. Also tolerates soils with brief flooding.
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Rounded
Exposure:
Sun
Fruit:
Acorn
Poison Part:
Acorns (seeds of nuts) and young leaves.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion.
Symptoms:
Stomach pain, constipation and later bloody diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Acorns (nuts) are edible after tannins are leached or boiled out. HARVEST TIME: Only collect nutsfrom areas you kn
Toxic Principle:
Gallotannins, quercitrin, and quercitin.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural areas; landscape as ornamental and shade trees.
Width:
40-50 ft.
Growth Rate:
Moderate
Leaf:
The leaves which are alternate and simple are typically 4-9” long and are variable on the same tree (obovate to broad oval with 3 to 9 pointed bristle-tipped lobes and rounded bases). The leaves are dark green above and pale green below. They remain on the tree late into fall with insignificant reddish brown fall color.
Tags:
deciduous, street tree, birds, butterflies, shade tree, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 2158

Quercus falcata, bark Quercus falcata, bark
Bruce Kirchoff, CC BY-NC-2.0
Quercus falcata, leaves Quercus falcata, leaves
Bruce Kirchoff, CC BY-NC-2.0
Quercus falcata, leaves Quercus falcata, leaves
Bruce Kirchoff, CC BY-NC-2.0
Quercus falcata, acorn Quercus falcata, acorn
Bruce Kirchoff, CC BY-NC-2.0