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Viburnum rufidulum

Common Name(s):
Rusty blackhaw, Rusty nannyberry, Southern blackhaw viburnum
Cultivar(s):
Royal Guard
Categories:
Native Plants, Shrubs, Trees
Comment:

Viburnum rufidulum, commonly called southern black haw, rusty black haw or rusty nannyberry, is a deciduous, suckering shrub or small tree that typically grows 10-20’ tall. It is native from Virginia to Florida west to Kansas and Texas.  Its bark is gray/brown with a fine blocky pattern.

Southern black haw is distinguished from the similar black haw (V. prunifolium) by its glossy green leaves and rusty brown hairs.

Regions:  Piedmont, Coastal plains

Seasons of Interest: 

  Leaf:  Fall                   Blooms:  Early spring            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Fall

Wildlife Value:  The Rusty blackhaw is moderately resistant to damage from deer.  It is a host plant for the spring/summer Azure butterflies.  Its fruits are eaten by songbirds, squirrels and chipmonks.  

 

Height:
10-20 ft.
Flower:
The Rusty blackhaw has tiny white flowers in showy rounded cymes (to 5” across) that bloom in spring. The flowers are followed by clusters of elliptic, edible, dark blue berries (to 3/8” long) that ripen in September-October.
Zones:
5 to 9
Habit:
Evergreen/Deciduous
Site:
The Rusty blackhaw grows best in average, dry to medium, well-drained loams in full sun to part shade. This plant generally grows denser in full sun. More than one plant should be used in order to facilitate proper pollination necessary for abundant fruit production. Promptly remove root suckers to prevent colonial spread unless naturalization is desired. It also needs to be protected from strong winds.
Texture:
Coarse
Form:
Large shrub or small tree; multi-stemmed; upright, oval
Exposure:
Sun, Part shade
Fruit:
Berries
Width:
10-20 ft.
Leaf:
The Rusty blackhaw has opposite, simple, glossy, leathery, ovate to obovate leaves (to 4” long) that are dark green. Its leaf undersides, buds and young stems are covered with rusty brown hairs.
Tags:
songbirds, host plant, deciduous, edible, hedge, butterflies, deer resistant, showy, good fall, evergreen

NCCES plant id: 1831

Viburnum rufidulum Viburnum rufidulum