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Osmanthus americanus

Common Name(s):
Devilwood, Wild olive
Categories:
Native Plants, Shrubs, Trees
Comment:

Osmanthus americanus, also called Devilwood or Wild olive is native to the southeastern US.   This shrub or small tree is often multitrunked with very strong wood.  It has an open loose habit and is drought tolerant once established. Small scented flowers appear in late spring and the fruit that follows attracts birds;.  Particularly resistant to damage by deer.  This plant is highly salt tolerant.

Synonym: Cartrema americana

Regions:  Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

  Leaf:  Fall                   Blooms:  Spring            Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Late Summer/Fall

Wildlife Value:   This plant is moderately resistant to damage from deer.  It provides cover during the winter and extreme weather.  Its fruits are eaten by birds and small mammals. 

 

Height:
15-25 ft.
Flower:
In the spring, small, urn-shaped, white flowers mature on the previous years growth of the Devilwood. This plant produces a dark blue drupe that matures in the fall.
Zones:
6-9
Habit:
Evergreen
Site:
The Devilwood can be grown in sun to partial shade, tolerating a range of soil conditions.
Texture:
Medium
Form:
Often multitrunked; open, loose habit
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil conditions
Fruit:
Creamy white flowers in early spring; fragrant; dark blue fruit
Width:
10-20 ft.
Leaf:
The leaf of the Devilwood is 2 to 4.5 in., opposite, simple and dark green. It is entire, with a smooth to slightly wavy margin and has a rusty colored underside. If grown in the sun, the leaves turn a yellow-green in the fall.
Tags:
coastal, drought tolerant, birds, fragrant, wildlife, salt tolerant, deer resistant, evergreen

NCCES plant id: 513

Osmanthus americanus Osmanthus americanus
Homer Edward Price, CC BY - 2.0
Osmanthus americanus var. megacarpus Osmanthus americanus var. megacarpus
Scott Zona, CC BY-NC-2.0
Osmanthus americanus Osmanthus americanus
Katja Schultz, CC BY - 2.0