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Rubus idaeus var. strigosus is often confused with:
Rubus idaeus var. idaeus
Plants that fill a similar niche:
Rubus idaeus var. idaeus
Rubus idaeus Rubus idaeus
Passiflora incarnata in Moore County in fall

Red Raspberry Rubus idaeus var. strigosus

Other plants called Red Raspberry:

Phonetic Spelling
ROO-bus eye-DAY-ee-us strig-OH-sus
Description

This genus has two main varieties, Rubus idaeus var. idaeus (European raspberry) which is native to Eurasia and Rubus idaeus var. strigosus (American red raspberry) which is native to a large part of North America. These two cultivars, or a cross of both, are typical of commercially grown raspberries.

The Genus Rubus includes blackberry, dewberry, and raspberry and most members of the Genus share the traits of thorny or bristly stems and compound leaves. Also, flowers and fruit appear on last season’s canes (branches), seldom on new shoots, which means one must be cautious when pruning and not remove the canes that will yield next year's berries. There are differences, however, among species; for example, some are erect or arching shrubs up to 8 feet high and others trail on the ground like vines. Some, such as dewberries, produce fruits in the spring while blackberries and raspberries fruit during the summer. In general, Genus Rubus contains some of the most important plants for wildlife in the southeast.

Rubus idaeus var. strigosus, commonly called Red raspberry or American red raspberry is a native perennial shrub with an erect and spreading habit. It is primarily grown for its very tasty fruits. First year stems bear only leaves. Lateral branches in the second year produce leaves, flowers and fruits. Pruning is essential in order to keep plants well-maintained, but care must be used to avoid pruning the second-year growth that will bear fruit. It is generally best to prune out old, summer-bearing canes as soon as fruiting is over to encourage new canes. Raspberry roots are perennial but the leaf- and fruit-bearing canes are biennial, each cane living only two growing seasons before dying This plant is moderately resistant to damage from deer and provides excellent cover year round for birds and small mammals. Butterflies and other insects are attracted to the blooms. Its fruits are relished by songbirds, small mammals, foxes, raccoons, and black bears. During the winter, birds and small mammals eat the seeds left from rotted fruit. White-tailed deer and rabbits browse the leaves.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems:

Anthracnose, botrytis, root rot and other fungal diseases can cause serious problems that may necessitate chemical treatments. Cane borers and crown borers are potentially serious insect pests.

 

VIDEO Created by Elisabeth Meyer for "Edibles, Bulbs, and Houseplants" a plant identification course offered in partnership with Longwood Gardens.    

More information on Rubus idaeus.

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Tags:
#bees#deciduous#perennial#shrub#wildlife plant#showy#weedy#nectar plant#medicinal#cover plant#playground#prickles#food source#bramble#trellises#dye plant#deer resistant#children's garden#edible fruits#pollinator plant#edible garden#edible#bird friendly#nectar plant late spring#butterfly friendly#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant mid-spring#wildlife plants#pollinator garden
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#bees#deciduous#perennial#shrub#wildlife plant#showy#weedy#nectar plant#medicinal#cover plant#playground#prickles#food source#bramble#trellises#dye plant#deer resistant#children's garden#edible fruits#pollinator plant#edible garden#edible#bird friendly#nectar plant late spring#butterfly friendly#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant mid-spring#wildlife plants#pollinator garden
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Rubus
    Species:
    idaeus
    Family:
    Rosaceae
    Uses (Ethnobotany):
    Fruit is highly edible fresh or frozen and often cooked into pies or as preserves.
    Life Cycle:
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Stem Cutting
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    North America
    Wildlife Value:
    Cover for birds and small mammals. Flowers attract butterflies, bees, and other insects. Fruits feed songbirds and small mammals.
    Particularly Resistant To (Insects/Diseases/Other Problems):
    Moderately resistent to deer.
    Edibility:
    Fruit can be eaten raw or cooked and delicious when eaten out of hand. The fruit is also used in pies, preserves etc. A herb tea is made from the dried leaves and some say that a type of tea made from raspberry and blackberry leaves is an excellent coffee substitute.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 3 ft. 0 in. - 9 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 3 ft. 0 in. - 9 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Edible
    Native Plant
    Perennial
    Shrub
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Arching
    Erect
    Multi-stemmed
    Spreading
    Growth Rate:
    Medium
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Coarse
    Appendage:
    Prickles
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    Clay
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil pH:
    Acid (<6.0)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Occasionally Dry
    Occasionally Wet
    Available Space To Plant:
    3 feet-6 feet
    6-feet-12 feet
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Mountains
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    4a, 4b, 5b, 5a, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, 8b, 8a
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Color:
    Orange
    Red/Burgundy
    Fruit Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Display/Harvest Time:
    Summer
    Fruit Type:
    Aggregate
    Drupe
    Fruit Length:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Width:
    < 1 inch
    Fruit Description:
    Botanically the fruits are not berries (though they are usually called berries)– they are instead made of many small drupes. The fruits hold together in a hollow cone.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Purple/Lavender
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Panicle
    Raceme
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Summer
    Flower Shape:
    Star
    Flower Petals:
    4-5 petals/rays
    Bracts
    Colored Sepals
    Flower Size:
    1-3 inches
    Flower Description:
    Flowers are in clusters, but are occasionally solitary. Each flower has five petals, five sepals, five bracts, numerous stamens, and several pistils clustered on a cone-shaped core known as a receptacle. Blooms late spring to early summer (April to June).
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Deciduous
    Semi-evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Gray/Silver
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Prickly
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Edible
    Leaf Type:
    Compound (Pinnately , Bipinnately, Palmately)
    Leaf Arrangement:
    Alternate
    Leaf Shape:
    Elliptical
    Ovate
    Leaf Margin:
    Doubly Serrate
    Serrate
    Hairs Present:
    Yes
    Leaf Length:
    3-6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Leaves are usually pinnately divided into 3-5 leaflets, infrequently undivided, with pleated wrinkles. Undersides are lighter and fuzzy.
  • Bark:
    Surface/Attachment:
    Peeling
    Bark Description:
    Bark peels with age.
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Purple/Lavender
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Surface:
    Hairy (pubescent)
    Stem Description:
    Stems can be differentiated from var. idaeus by the glandular hairs on the stem surface. They are also covered in sharp prickles.
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Recreational Play Area
    Vertical Spaces
    Landscape Theme:
    Butterfly Garden
    Children's Garden
    Edible Garden
    Pollinator Garden
    Rain Garden
    Design Feature:
    Barrier
    Screen/Privacy
    Attracts:
    Bees
    Butterflies
    Pollinators
    Small Mammals
    Songbirds
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Deer
    Wet Soil
    Problems:
    Spines/Thorns
    Weedy