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Hydrangea anomala subsp. Petiolaris

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Climbing hydrangea
Cultivar(s):
Brookside Littlelery
Categories:
Poisonous Plants, Vines
Comment:

Are you looking for an ornamental vine with year-round interest? Look no further. The climbing hydrangea is the plant for you! The vine has rich green foliage, mid-summer white flowers, yellow fall color, and striking exfoliating bark in winter. This deciduous vine can’t be seen in any season without making a visual statement.

According to Donald Wyman, respected American authority on woody plants, “There is no better climbing vine.” Climbing hydrangea is excellent for a massed effect on brick or concrete walls, arbors, gazebos, or most any free-standing garden structure. This woody vine has an almost shrub-like appearance due to its lateral branches.

Climbing hydrangea is somewhat slow to establish and slow to begin flowering after transplanting. It prefers rich, well-drained, moist soil. It will grow in sun or shade and can easily grow 60 to 80 feet in its lifespan. Introduced in 1865 from Asia, this deciduous vine should find a home in most North Carolina landscapes. 

Insect Disease and other Pest Problems: Once established, it becomes carefree with no serious pest problems.

Description:
Deciduous shrub; leaves opposite, simple, stalked, toothed and sometimes lobed; flowers in terminal, white clusters; the sterile flowers (around the margin or the entire cluster) are much enlarged.
Height:
60-80 feet
Flower:
White flowers in late spring to mid summer on horizontal shoots.
Zones:
4 to 8
Habit:
Deciduous
Texture:
Medium
Exposure:
Sun to shade
Origin:
Asia
Poison Part:
Bark, leaves, flower buds.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion.
Symptoms:
Nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, sweating.
Toxic Principle:
Hydrangin, a cyanogenic glycoside.
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN.
Found in:
Houseplant or interiorscape; landscape as woody shrub; forest or natural area as native shrub.
Growth Rate:
Initially slow
Climbing Method:
Aerial roots
Tags:
deciduous, fall foliage, fall color, show stopper, showstopper, arbor, yearround interest, gazebo

NCCES plant id: 2282

Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris H. anomala subsp. petiolaris growth habit
Photo by Sonya, CC-BY-SA-2.0
Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris H. anomala subsp. petiolaris blooms
Photo by Kerry Woods, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0