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Datura stramonium

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Jamestown weed, Jimsonweed, datura, stinkweed, thorn-apple
Categories:
Perennials, Poisonous Plants
Description:
Annual herb, stem green to purplish, ill-scented, with alternate, simple, coarsely toothed leaves; flower solitary, large, tubular with 5 shallow lobes at top, white or lavender. Egg-shaped seed capsule can be spiny or smooth, with many glossy black seeds. Flowers open at night and are quite fragrant and fed upon by nocturnal moths.
Height:
2-5 feet
Flower Color:
white to lavender purple
Hardiness:
frost sensitive
Exposure:
full sun
Family:
Solanaceae
Origin:
North America
Distribution:
Naturalized and weedy, cultivated
Poison Part:
All parts, mainly seeds and leaves
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Hot, dry, and flushed skin, hallucinations, pupil dilation, headache, delirium, rapid and weak pulse, convulsions, and coma
Toxic Principle:
Tropane alkaloids
Severity:
Toxic only if large quantities are eaten.
Found in:
Weedy in disturbed areas, along roadsides, old fields, pastures, waste places; landscape as weed in gardens
Tags:
weed, showy flowers, white flowers, poisonous, wildlife, lavender flowers, moths

NCCES plant id: 1026

Datura stramonium Datura stramonium
Datura stramonium Datura stramonium
Datura stramonium Datura stramonium
Datura stramonium Datura stramonium