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Campsis radicans

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Cow-itch, Trumpet creeper, Trumpet vine
Cultivar(s):
Atropurpurea , Crimson Trumpet , Flava , Minor , Praecox , Spec, Atropurpurea , Crimson Trumpet , Flava , Minor , Praecox , Spec
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Vines
Comment:

Campsis radicans, commonly called trumpet vine or trumpet creeper, is a dense, vigorous, multi-stemmed, deciduous, woody, clinging vine that attaches itself to structures and climbs by aerial rootlets. It is native to the southeastern U. S., but has naturalized in many northern states. Species plants rapidly grow to 30-40' high. It's compound, odd-pinnate leaves (to 15” long) are shiny dark green above and glabrous dull green below. Each leaf has 7 to 11 elliptic to oblong leaflets (to 4" long) with serrated margins. The leaves turn yellow in the fall.  It's bark is pale brown and scaly.  

Trumpet vine is also commonly known as cow-itch vine because some people experience skin redness and itching after coming in contact with the leaves.

It is easily grown in a wide variety of soils. It is best planted in lean to average soils with regular moisture in full sun to part shade. Foliage grows well in shade, but plants need good sun for best flowering. It blooms on new growth, so early spring pruning will not affect the flowering. Vines must be grown on sturdy structures because mature plants produce considerable weight. The problem with species plants (Campsis radicans) is usually not how to grow them but how to restrain them, in large part because they sucker profusely from underground runners and freely self-seed, often forming impenetrable colonies in the wild which can choke out many plants that get in their way.

Regions:  Mountain, Piedmond, Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

  Blooms:  Summer      Nut/Fruit/Seed:  Fall

Wildlife Value:  This plant is moderately resistant to damage from deer.  The flowers are attractive to hummingbirds which are the principle pollinator of this plant.  White-tailed deer and rabbits eat the foilage.

 

Description:
Woody, deciduous, or partly evergreen vine; leaves opposite, pinnately divided into 9-11 leaflets with toothed margins; flowers in clusters, tubular, orange-yellow to red; fruit an elongated slender capsule with many winged seeds
Height:
20-40 ft.
Flower:
The Trumpet creeper has clusters (terminal cymes) of red trumpet-shaped flowers (to 3” long) that appear throughout the summer (June to September). Its flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds. The flowers are followed by long, bean-like seed pods (3-5” long) which split open when ripe releasing numerous 2-winged seeds for dispersal by the wind. This plant flowers on new growth and has the best flower production in full sun.
Zones:
4-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Texture:
Coarse
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; range of soil types
Family:
Bignoniaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Leaves, flowers.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Dermatitis, ingestion
Symptoms:
Skin irritation with redness and swelling
Toxic Principle:
Unidentified
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES.
Found in:
Forest or natural area in dry woods, roadsides, along fences; weedy in disturbed areas; landscape as woody, flowering vine
Growth Rate:
Rapid
Climbing Method:
Aerial roots but needs additional support
Tags:
apvg, showy flowers, deciduous, birds, hummingbirds, wildlife, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 450

Campsis radicans Campsis radicans
Campsis radicans Campsis radicans
Campsis radicans Campsis radicans
Campsis radicans flowers
beautifulcataya, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Campsis radicans fruit
Anthony Mendoza, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Campsis radicans habit with flowers & leaves
Dinesh Valke, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0