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Caltha palustris

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Marsh marigold
Categories:
Native Plants, Perennials, Poisonous Plants, Wildflowers
Comment:

Marsh marigold is a native rhizomatous herbaceous perennial in the buttercup (Ranuculaceae) family.  It is found from Newfoundland to Alaska south to Nebraska, Tennessee and North Carolina.  Its name is misleading because it does not look like, nor is it realated to marigolds, which are in the aster (Asteraceae) family.  It is perfect for water gardens, pond edges, rain gardens, and wet, boggy areas in the landscape because it requires constant moisture for survival and it toerates wet soil.  It prefers full sun for best flowering but does well with some afternoon shade in the summer.  It is a great early bloomer in the spring with striking yellow flowers. If it is situated in full sun in the summer, the plant may go dormant.  This plant will naturalize easily in your yard spreading by seed.  It is listed as endangered on the North Carolina Protected Plant list.

It typically grows 12-18” tall on hollow, branching stems. 

Wildlife:  This plant is deer resistant. 

Insects, Diseases, and Other Problems:  No serious insect or disease problems. Can be susceptible to rust and powdery mildew.  This is a low maintanance plant that is easy to grow.

May be confused with: Ficaria verna and Geum radiatum.  Ficaria is weedy.

Consider Planting: Geum radiatum

Season:
Spring, summer
Height:
1-2 ft.
Flower Color:
Yellow
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 4-9
Foliage:
Long-stalked, roundish to cordate, glossy green basal heart-shaped leaves; 2-7 in. long; low teeth on margins. Leaves achive mature size in summer well after flowering. Upper stem leaves are smaller and stalkless.
Flower:
1-2 inches in diameter, with 5-9 bright shiny waxy deep yellow petal-like sepals. Blooms in spring (April-June). Flowers give way to seed pods which split open when ripe to disperse the seeds within.
Zones:
3-7
Site:
Moist soil; sun to partial shade
Propagation:
Rhizome division in fall
Exposure:
Partial shade, sun
Fruit:
Dry seed pods split open disperse red seeds
Soil:
Wet soil
Regions:
Mountains, Piedmont, Coastal Plain
Family:
Ranunculaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Native locally in mountains; cultivated
Poison Part:
Leaves
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Burning of the throat, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, and convulsions
Edibility:
Edible parts: cooked, early spring greens are edible. Safe handling procedures: cover the young leaves with 2-3 changes of boiling water until barely tender; cut into bite-sized pieces, salt lightly, and cover with butter and some vinegar. Tightly closed flower buds can be pickled after covering with boiling water as described for leaves and make a great substitute for capers. No part of this plant should ever be eaten raw however.
Toxic Principle:
Protoanemonin
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural area, marshy ground in mountains; landscape, cultivated as herbaceous perennial in flower gardens and water gardens
Life Cycle:
Perennial
Tags:
naturalize, pond, sun, summer, spring, low maintenance, yellow, wildflower, perennial, partial shade, water garden, boggy, rain garden, deer resistant

NCCES plant id: 690

Caltha palustris Whole plant near the water.
BerndH, CC-BY-SA-3.0
Caltha palustris Flower
H. Zell, CC-BY-SA-3.0
Caltha palustris Whole plant
Michael Gäbler, CC-BY-3.0