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Pinus palustris

Common Name(s):
Longleaf pine
Categories:
Native Plants, Trees
Comment:

The Pinus palustris, or Longleaf Pine is an evergreen tree that may grow 80 to 120 feet tall.  This tree has 8 inch to 18 inch slender and feathery needles in clusters of 3.  The needle clusters tend to be tufted at the end of the branches.  As the tree ages, the bark thickens forming irregular, flaky plates.  

 It is a difficult tree to transplant.  Also not tolerant to lightning, high winds or drought.  It grows in "grass like" stage for first 5 years.

Regions:  Piedmont, Coastal Plains

Seasons of Interest: 

     Bloom:   Spring     Fruit/Seed/Nut:  Fall

Wildlife Value:  The Longleaf pine provides winter cover.  Fox and gray squirrels, quail, brown-headed nuthatches, mourning doves, and turkeys eat the seeds.  Red-cockaded woodpeckers excavate cavities in the living specimens of this species.

 Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems:  This tree is susceptible to ice and storm damage.

Height:
80-100 ft.
Flower:
In the spring, the Longleaf pine will produce long yellow-red male and oval purple female flowers. This tree also produces a purple-blue male cone and a dark purple female cone.
Zones:
7b-9
Habit:
Evergreen
Site:
The Longleaf pine does best in full sun. It grows well in sandy or clay soils.
Texture:
Fine
Form:
Open; rounded top; tall straight trunk
Exposure:
Sun
Fruit:
Cone
Width:
30-40 ft.
Growth Rate:
Rapid
Leaf:
The leaves of the Loneleaf pine are 8 to 18 inch needles that grow in clusters of 3.
Tags:
full sun tree, tall tree, pine straw, deer resistant, leaf, longleaf, long-leaf pine, mulch, long pine, long, evergreen

NCCES plant id: 2102

Pinus palustris Trees
Homer Edward Price, CC BY - 4.0
Pinus palustris Tree
Scott Zona, CC BY-NC - 4.0
Pinus palustris Branch
Harum.koh, CC BY-SA - 4.0
Pinus palustris Cone
Seuss, CC BY-NC-ND - 4.0
Pinus palustris Bark
Kerry Woods, CC BY-NC-ND - 4.0
Pinus palustris Young Tree
Cliff, CC BY - 4.0
Pinus palustris Seedling
John S. Quarterman