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Ridderstjerne Hippeastrum

Previously known as:

  • Amaryllis
Phonetic Spelling
hip-ee-AY-strum
This plant has medium severity poison characteristics.
See below
Description

The genus Hippeastrum has about 90 species and hundreds of cultivars. For many years there was confusion among botanists over the generic names Amaryllis and Hippeastrum, resulting in the common name amaryllis used for cultivars of this genus, while the generic name Amaryllis was applied to bulbs from South Africa, usually grown outdoors. This article describes the cultivar amaryllis of the genus, Hippeastrum. They are perennial herbaceous bulbs, often sold for flowering indoors, particularly during the winter holiday season. They have basal, strap-shaped leaves with stout, hollow stems that rise 2-3 ft. tall.  Each stem bears 2 or more stalked flowers at the top.  The flowers are horizontal or drooping, funnel-shaped, and 6-parted, with hybrids available in red, pink, white, salmon, and various bicolors.  If grown outdoors, It flowers in late spring around May. The large blooms last for 3-4 weeks.  They are great for use in beds, borders, as exhibition bulbs, and as fresh cut flowers

Hippeastrums grow best in full sun or, indoors, with morning sun but not direct afternoon sun. Sun dappled shade or bright shade is best for outdoor plants. They tolerate drought, but keep the soil moist during the active growing season.  When planting, bury bulbs neck up with half the bulb above the surface in humus rich, well-draining potting soil mix and space 6 to 12 inches apart.  Plants are injured at temperatures below 35 degrees F (2C) and can normally only survive the winter in climate zones 9 and 10; however, they are known to survive the winter in zones 7 and 8 if properly mulched.  

Typically, Amaryllis bulbs are planted in pots between mid-fall and late winter for bloom approximately 5 weeks later. Bulbs may also be started indoors in early spring and moved outside for late spring to early summer bloom. Regardless of growing cycle, bulbs need a period of recovery and rejuvenation after bloom when flowers are removed but foliage is left in tact and reduced watering is continued. The plants remain dormant for at least 2 months before starting the bloom cycle over.

Diseases, Insects, and Other Plant Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Mealybugs are occasional visitors. Watch for snails if plants are taken outdoors.

See this plant in the following landscape:
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#poisonous#drought tolerant#container plant#houseplants#winter bulbs#spring flowering bulbs#problem for cats#ebh#problem for dogs#problem for horses#ebh-g
 
Cultivars / Varieties:
Tags:
#bulb#showy flowers#poisonous#drought tolerant#container plant#houseplants#winter bulbs#spring flowering bulbs#problem for cats#ebh#problem for dogs#problem for horses#ebh-g
  • Attributes:
    Genus:
    Hippeastrum
    Family:
    Amaryllidaceae
    Life Cycle:
    Bulb
    Perennial
    Recommended Propagation Strategy:
    Division
    Seed
    Country Or Region Of Origin:
    Central and South America
    Bulb Storage:
    Mulch during the winter in zones 7-8.
    Dimensions:
    Height: 2 ft. 0 in. - 3 ft. 0 in.
    Width: 0 ft. 9 in. - 1 ft. 0 in.
  • Whole Plant Traits:
    Plant Type:
    Bulb
    Poisonous
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Habit/Form:
    Erect
    Growth Rate:
    Rapid
    Maintenance:
    Medium
    Texture:
    Medium
  • Cultural Conditions:
    Light:
    Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day)
    Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours)
    Soil Texture:
    High Organic Matter
    Loam (Silt)
    Soil Drainage:
    Good Drainage
    Moist
    Available Space To Plant:
    Less than 12 inches
    NC Region:
    Coastal
    Piedmont
    USDA Plant Hardiness Zone:
    7b, 7a, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a, 10a, 10b
  • Fruit:
    Fruit Type:
    Capsule
    Fruit Description:
    The fruit forms a trivalve capsule containing seeds which are dry, flattened, obliquely winged.
  • Flowers:
    Flower Color:
    Pink
    Red/Burgundy
    White
    Flower Inflorescence:
    Umbel
    Flower Value To Gardener:
    Good Cut
    Showy
    Flower Bloom Time:
    Spring
    Winter
    Flower Shape:
    Funnel
    Flower Petals:
    6 petals/rays
    Flower Size:
    3-6 inches
    Flower Description:
    Umbelliform with two or more flowers per stem. Blooms last 3-4 weeks. Flower color includes spotting or banding. Each flower is 5 to 8 inches across, and the native species are usually purple or red. They curve downwards and then upwards at the tip. The perianth has six brightly colored tepals (three outer sepals and three inner petals) that may be similar in appearance or very different. The perianth segments are subequal or unequal. The tepals are united at the base to form a short tube, usually with a rudimentary scaly paraperigonium with fimbriae or a callose ridge present at the throat.
  • Leaves:
    Woody Plant Leaf Characteristics:
    Broadleaf Evergreen
    Leaf Color:
    Green
    Leaf Feel:
    Glossy
    Leaf Value To Gardener:
    Long-lasting
    Leaf Shape:
    Linear
    Leaf Margin:
    Entire
    Hairs Present:
    No
    Leaf Length:
    > 6 inches
    Leaf Width:
    1-3 inches
    Leaf Description:
    Large, 12 to 36 inch, strap-shaped green leaves begin to grow at about the time the flowers open. Leaves may reach 12-36 inches long
  • Stem:
    Stem Color:
    Green
    Stem Is Aromatic:
    No
    Stem Form:
    Straight
    Stem Description:
    stout-but-hollow leafless flowering stems (scapes) grow 12-18” tall
  • Landscape:
    Landscape Location:
    Container
    Houseplants
    Design Feature:
    Accent
    Border
    Specimen
    Resistance To Challenges:
    Drought
    Problems:
    Poisonous to Humans
    Problem for Cats
    Problem for Dogs
    Problem for Horses
  • Poisonous to Humans:
    Poison Severity:
    Medium
    Poison Symptoms:
    Toxic if eaten in large quantities. Vomiting, salvation, diarrhea; large ingestions cause convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias. Bulbs are the most poisonous part. Especially harmful to pets.
    Poison Toxic Principle:
    Alkaloid lycorine
    Causes Contact Dermatitis:
    No
    Poison Part:
    Flowers
    Leaves
    Stems