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Asimina triloba 'Susquehanna'

Common Name(s):
Susquehanna pawpaw
Cultivar(s):
'Susquehanna'
Categories:
Edible Plants, Native Plants, Trees
Comment:

Pawpaw is a small native deciduous tree. It will appear in clusters in understory canopy of forests, but it needs full sun to ensure fruiting. It is a slow growing tree which needs several years to bear fruit. It is self-fertile so it does not need another tree to produce its large, edible fruits.  Early Americans made a yellow dye from the pulp of the ripened fruit.

It works well to naturalize in a native plant or wild garden, a shrub border, woodland margin or in damp areas along ponds or streams.

Wildlife Value: Raccooons, squirrels, and opposums actively seek out fruits and often beat humans to the harvest.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: The pawpaw tree produces self-defensive compounds so pests are not usually a problem.

Height:
15-20 ft.
Flower:
Cup-shaped purple flower (3 green sepals and 6 purple petals in two tiers) appear in spring, and give way to edible, oblong, yellowish green fruits which mature in early autumn to a dark brown.
Zones:
5-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Full sun, partial shade, shade tolerant. Full-sun to ensure fruiting. Well-drained, deep, slightly acid fertile soil.
Texture:
Coarse
Form:
Upright, pyramidal crown in full sun
Fruit:
Large, yellow, edible
Edibility:
Susquehanna pawpaw produces very large fruit with few seeds. It is extremely sweet with a rich taste. Ripens mid to late season.
Width:
15-20 ft.
Growth Rate:
Slow
Leaf:
It features alternate, simple, oblong green leaves. Showy yellow fall color.
Tags:
rain garden, edible, deciduous, low maintenance, fall color

NCCES plant id: 3029

 Asimina triloba 'Susquehanna' The fruit in the middle.
Photo by bfbraum, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Asimina triloba 'Susquehanna' Close up if fruit
Photo by Edible Landscaping, CC BY - 2.0