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Symphyotrichum novi-belgii

Common Name(s):
New York aster, Sapphire aster
Categories:
Herbs, Native Plants, Perennials, Wildflowers
Comment:

Previously known as Aster novi-belgii.  

New York Aster is a herbaceous perennial in the Asteraceae family that may grow 3 to 5 feet high.  Its low growing habit and fall bloom works well as an edge plant in the front of borders, or in rock garden or butterfly gardens. It works well with or as  substitute for chrysanthemums.

Regions: Piedmont, Coastal Plain

Seasons of Interest:

     Blooms: Late Summer to Early Fall; Fruit/Seed/Nut: Late Fall to Winter

Wildlife Value: Moderate deer resistance. Host plant for the Pearl Crescent butterfly. Flowers are attractive to bees and butterflies. Songbirds and small mammals eat the seeds. Members of the genus Symphyotrichum support the following specialized bees: Andrena (Callandrena s.l.) asterisAndrena (Callandrena s.l.) asteroidesAndrena (Cnemidandrena) hirticinctaAndrena (Cnemidandrena) nubeculaAndrena (Callandrena s.l.) placataAndrena (Callandrena s.l.) simplexand Colletes simulans.

Insects, Diseases, and Other Plant Problems: No serious insect or disease problems but has some susceptibility to powdery mildew.

 Compare this Plant to: Symphyotrichum lateriflorumSymphyotrichum pilosumSymphyotrichum prenanthoides

Season:
Summer
Height:
3 - 5 ft.
Space:
1-2 ft
Flower Color:
Purple, pink
Foliage:
The leaves are alternate with a smooth margin. The stem is only slightly downy.
Flower:
Light purple to pink flowers with a yellow-orange center mature in late summer to early fall. This wildflower produces a dry seed (achene) that matures in late fall.
Zones:
4-8
Habit:
Low bushy
Exposure:
Full sun to light shade
Soil:
Moist
Tags:
cpp, wildflower, showy flowers, bees, purple, nectar, pollinator, specialized bees, butterflies, native bees, wildlife

NCCES plant id: 3169

Symphyotrichum novi-belgii Symphyotrichum novi-belgii
Rob Young, CC BY - 2.0
Symphyotrichum novi-belgii Form
Symphyotrichum novi-belgii Flower
Uwe W., CC-BY-SA-3.0