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Lupinus spp.

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Lupine
Categories:
Perennials, Poisonous Plants
Comment:

Over 300 species of Lupines exist; most are native to the Western USA, and require a cool climate. Native lupines such as L. perennis and L. diffusus grow in the coastal plain but may be difficult to find horticulturally. Hybrid Lupines such as the Russell Hybrids are best for cool mountain gardens; treat as annuals in zones 7-8.

Description:
Annual, biennial, or perennial herbs; leaves alternate, simple or palmately divided; flowers showy in terminal, elongated clusters, pea-like, blue to purple, pinkish or white; fruit an elongated, flattened pod.
Season:
late spring to early summer
Height:
36-48 in.
Flower Color:
blue, pink, red, yellow
Hardiness:
4-6
Propagation:
seed planted in fall
Exposure:
full sun to partial shade
Soil:
well drained, acidic soil
Regions:
Mountains
Family:
Fabaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Seeds
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Respiratory depression and slow heartbeat, sleepiness, convulsions
Toxic Principle:
Alkaloids such as lupinine, anagyrine, sparteine, and hydroxylupanine
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN
Found in:
Forest or natural areas in sandhills, clearings, open woods and fields; landscape in flower gardens as cultivated herbaceous perennial

NCCES plant id: 741

Lupinus spp. Lupinus spp.
Lupinus spp. Lupinus spp.
Lupinus spp. Lupinus spp.