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Iris ensata

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Japanese water iris
Cultivar(s):
'Silverband', 'Sanda No Otome'
Categories:
Perennials, Poisonous Plants, Spring Bulbs, Water Garden
Comment:

Perennial beardless iris from Japan in the Iridaceae family. Prefers a sunny site but tolerates partial shade.  Grows best grown on water edges in damp, rich soil with aboundant moisture during the growing season.  Can even withstand standing water but in the winter it does not tolerate standing water.  For best results, remove plants from water garden in fall, or plant rhizomes in pots about halfway in the ground and then remove to dryer ground for the fall and winter.  Blooms in mid summer after later bearded and Siberian irises.  Divide rhizomes about every three years after flowering. Plant new rhizomes about 1-2 in. deep.  Make excellent cut flowers.

Seasons of Interest:

    Bloom: Summer, June-July

Wildlife Value:  Tolerates damage by deer.

Compare this Plant to: Iris germanicaIris sibirica

Season:
Summer
Light:
Full sun to partial shade
Height:
2-4 ft.
Space:
1.5-2 ft.
Flowering Period:
June-July
Flower Color:
Blue, lavender, violet red, pink, white
Depth:
1-2 inches deep
Usage:
Boarders, flower beds, cut flowers
Foliage:
Leaves long sword-shaped light green strap-like, with prominent midrib, overlapping at base, oriented in one plane
Flower:
White, pink, lavender, blue, violet, crimson, yellow butterfly-like flowers; many have bold markings. Can have one to several blooms several at the top of a naked stem, 6-parted with 3 outer, spreading or pendent "falls" and 3 inner, erect "standards", with standards being smaller than the falls. Fruit a capsule.
Propagation:
Rhizome division in the fall
Exposure:
Full sun to partial shade
Soil:
Moist
Family:
Iridaceae
Origin:
Japan, northern China, eastern Russia
Poison Part:
Rhizomes (thickened roots) and rootstocks, fresh or dry.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion, dermatitis.
Symptoms:
Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, elevated temperature following ingestion; skin irritation upon contact with seeds, rootstock, or cell sap.
Toxic Principle:
Irisin, iridin, or irisine.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR, OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES.
Found in:
Houseplant or interiorscape; forest or natural area in native woodlands, marshes, and shallow water; landscape in flower gardens
Tags:
pond, showy flowers, wet soil, wet sites, water garden, cut flowers, wet

NCCES plant id: 2350

Iris ensata Iris ensata
Iris ensata Iris ensata
Iris ensata Iris ensata 'Sanda No Otome'
KENPEI, CC-BY-SA-3.0