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Aconitum spp.

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Aconite, Monkshood, wolfsbane
Categories:
Perennials, Poisonous Plants
Comment:

Monkshood is poisonous, with a narcotic juice present in the leaves and roots. Do not plant near the vegetable garden, where its fleshy roots could be mistaken for Jerusalem artichokes.

Description:
Perennial herbs with ascending or nearly trailing stems; leaves alternate, simple, palmately 3-9-lobed; flowers white or blue-purple, the upper part hood- or helmit-like.
Season:
Mid to late summer
Height:
36-48 in.
Flower Color:
Blue to violet
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 3 to 7
Propagation:
Division of clumps in fall
Exposure:
Full sun to partial shade
Soil:
Moist, well-drained soil
Regions:
Mountains
Family:
Ranunculaceae
Origin:
Europe
Distribution:
Mountains, Piedmont.
Poison Part:
All parts
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Burning of lips and mouth, numbness of throat; intense vomiting and diarrhea, muscular weakness and spasms, weak pulse, paralysis of the respiratory system, convulsions; may be fatal
Toxic Principle:
Alkaloids aconitine and others
Severity:
HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN!
Found in:
Forest or natural area, moist woods and along creek banks; landscape, flower garden as herbaceous perennial
Tags:
sun, summer, perennial, blue, purple, poisonous, partial shade

NCCES plant id: 669

Aconitum spp. Aconitum spp.
Aconitum spp. Aconitum spp.
Aconitum spp. Aconitum spp.
Aconitum spp. Aconitum spp.
Aconitum spp. Aconitum spp.
S. Rae, CC BY - 2.0