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Robinia pseudoacacia

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Black locust
Cultivar(s):
Frisia, Tortuosa
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Trees
Comment:

Young growth has thorns; root sprouts; small branches fall easily during storms; some leaves yellow and fall during drought; forms a dense thicket; rapid grower; good plant for difficult sites; transplants well; tends to reseed; develops shoots from roots; a legume - fixes its own nitrogen; salt tolerant.

The wood from this native is naturally rot resistant and often used to make fence posts and rails.

Description:
Large, deciduous tree, with twin spines at the base of the leaf at least in juvenile growth; leaves alternate, pinnately divided with 7-25 leaflets, each elliptical with a smooth margin; flowers white, fragrant, pea-like, in an elongated, drooping cluster; fruit a flattened pod
Height:
30-50 ft.
Flower:
Pendulous white wisteria like flowers in spring; very fragrant; flat brown black pods
Zones:
4-8
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Sun; tolerates a range of soil types; drought and poor soil tolerant
Texture:
Fine to medium
Form:
Upright; straight trunk; becomes ragged with age
Exposure:
Sun; tolerates a range of soil types; drought tolerant
Fruit:
Pendulous white wisteria-like flowers in spring; very fragrant; flat brown-black pods
Family:
Fabaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Inner bark, young leaves, seeds
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Depression, weakness, dilated pupils, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, weak pulse, coldness of arms and legs, paleness, and shock
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Flowers HARVEST TIME: Only collect flowers from areas you know have NOT been treated with pesticides. SAFE HANDLING PROCEDURES: Soak flowers in warm water for several minutes to remove dirt and debris. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer. These products can leave a residue. Remove the stems from the flowers. Chop flowers and add to bread dough or to muffin/pancake batter. Whole flowers can be battered and deep fried.
Toxic Principle:
Robin, a phytotoxin; robitin, a glycoside; robinine, an alkaloid
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN.
Found in:
Forest or natural areas in dry woods; weedy in disturbed areas, roadsides, fencerows; landscape used as an ornamental flowering tree
Leaf:
6 to 14 in. alternate, pinnately compound; nonshowy yellow brown fall color

NCCES plant id: 547

Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia
Robinia pseudoacacia Robinia pseudoacacia