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Lycopersicon esculentum

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Tomato
Category:
Poisonous Plants
Comment:

According to Dr. Anna Dulaney, Clinical Toxicologist and Assistant Director of Education for the Carolinas Poison Center, since their database began in 1997 there has been only one reference to a child having a reaction related to consuming tomato leaves or stems.  In that instance, the child made and consumed a "Pie" consisting of cedar wood chips, grass clippings, tomato leaves and various other items.  That child vomited, but due to the large number of ingredients in the mixture, it is impossible to attribute the upset stomach to the consumption of tomato leaves.  She noted that in their database, the largest number of tomato leaves consumed at one time was 5 or 6 and that there were no ill effects. (This footnote inserted by Dr. Lucy Bradley, NC State Extension Urban Horticulture Specialist 10/26/2010)

Description:
Annual herb, strong-scented; leaves alternate, simple but deeply pinnately lobed and toothed; flowers 5-parted, yellow; fruit a red or yellow berry.
Family:
Solanaceae
Origin:
South America
Distribution:
Landscape in vegetable gardens, cultivated for fruit
Poison Part:
Headache, abdominal pain, dilated pupils, vomiting, diarrhea, circulatory and respiratory depression, loss of sensation
Poison Delivery Mode:
Leaves and stems
Symptoms:
EDIBLE PARTS: Berries (tomatoes) edible when unripe (green) or ripe (red), and raw, cooked, or dried
Toxic Principle:
Glycoalkoloids: solanine and demissine
Severity:
TOXIC ONLY IF LARGE QUANTITIES EATEN
Found in:
Ingestion

NCCES plant id: 1088

Lycopersicon esculentum Lycopersicon esculentum