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Galerina autumnalis

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Deadly Galernia, Autumn Skullcap
Category:
Poisonous Plants
Comment:

The small brown sticky caps, white annulus, rusty brown spore prints and occurrence on rotted wood are good diagnostic characteristics. This species is one of a complex that is best separated by an expert. Galerina marginata and G.veneata also contain the same toxins produced by G. autumnalis making these three species some of our most poisonous mushrooms.

Description:
CAP small, about 1.5-2.5 in. in diameter, sticky when moist, dark brown to brownish yellow as it dries, margin striate when wet; GILLS attached to the top of the stalk, yellow becoming brown as spores develop; STALK light brown to tan, fibrillose below annulus, hollow, base with dense white mycelium; ANNULUS white becoming brown with spore deposit, located near the top of the stalk, may disappear with age; SPORE PRINT rusty brown
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Apparently well distributed throughout NC
Poison Part:
Mushroom
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Symptoms may occur 6-24 hours after eating and include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea which may persist 6-9 hours. Initial symptoms are frequently followed by a lag period up to 24 hours. During this symptomless period toxins are severely affecting the liver resulting in gastrointestinal bleeding, coma, kidney failure and death usually within 7 days after eating.
Edibility:
NOT EDIBLE!
Toxic Principle:
The small brown sticky caps, white annulus, rusty brown spore prints and occurrence on rotted wood are good diagnostic character
Severity:
HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN!
Found in:
Forest or natural area, landscape. Singly or in small clusters on rotted wood

NCCES plant id: 1055

Galerina autumnalis Galerina autumnalis