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Papaver somniferum

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Opium poppy, common poppy
Categories:
Perennials, Poisonous Plants
Comment:

It is illegal to grow opium poppies in North Carolina, but it is legal to sell and buy the seeds. . Opium is made from the milky sap of the fruit capsules. Take care that pets and children do not sample poppies as they are poisonous. Opium poppy reseeds and may spread in southern gardens. A "pass-along" plant of great beauty.

Description:
Erect annual with milky juice; leaves alternate, simple, clasping, toothed; flowers terminal, with 5-more showy petals (white, pink, red, or purple); fruit a capsule with an expanded disc at the top and over small holes through which the minute seeds are dispersed.
Season:
Late spring
Height:
24-36 in.
Flower Color:
Pink, white, bluish, apricot
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 8-10
Propagation:
Seed planted in fall flowers in spring
Exposure:
Full sun
Soil:
Well-drained
Regions:
Piedmont, Coastal Plain
Family:
Papaveraceae
Origin:
Europe
Distribution:
Illegally planted, sometimes persisting in old gardens
Poison Part:
Dried milky sap from all parts, but mainly fruits
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion
Symptoms:
Stupor, coma, shallow and slow breathing, respiratory and circulatory depression
Edibility:
EDIBLE PARTS: Poppy seeds used as topping of breads are safe
Toxic Principle:
Alkaloids, morphine and others
Severity:
HIGHLY TOXIC, MAY BE FATAL IF EATEN!
Found in:
In landscape occasionally in flower garden, it is illegal to cultivate opium poppy. The garden poppies are a different species and may or may not contain opium alkaloids

NCCES plant id: 757

Papaver somniferum Papaver somniferum
Papaver somniferum Papaver somniferum