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Dianthus spp.

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Pinks, Carnation, clove pinks, rainbow pinks
Categories:
Edible Plants, Perennials, Poisonous Plants
Comment:

Make sure that the air circulation is good around Pinks, because they are susceptible to fungal diseases; choose fragrant cultivars to add a spicy scent to the garden. Prior to eating the sweet or spicy clove flavored flowers remove the bitter, narrow base of the petals.  Good cut flower, Fragrant

Description:
Perennial herbs; leaves narrow and often gray-waxy; flowers 5-parted, often fragrant, pink-lilac, pink-purple or white.
Season:
Late spring to early summer
Height:
6-24 in.
Flower Color:
Rose, pink, white
Hardiness:
USDA Hardiness Zone 4-9
Propagation:
Seed, cuttings, division in spring
Exposure:
Full sun
Soil:
Well-drained, alkaline soil
Regions:
Mountains, Piedmont, Coastal Plain
Family:
Caryophyllaceae
Origin:
Eurasia
Poison Part:
Leaves.
Poison Delivery Mode:
Dermatitis, ingestion.
Symptoms:
No reports of ingestion. Skin irritation reported from contact with clove pinks.
Toxic Principle:
Triterpenoid saponins.
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR, OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES.
Found in:
Houseplant or interiorscape; florist plants; landscape in flower garden as herbaceous perennial.

NCCES plant id: 702

Dianthus spp. Dianthus spp.
Dianthus spp. Dianthus spp.
Dianthus spp. Dianthus spp.