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Asimina triloba

This plant has poison characteristics. See below.
Common Name(s):
Pawpaw
Cultivar(s):
Davis, Sunflower, Overleese, NC-1, Shenandoah, Susquehanna, Wabash, Potomac, Allegheny, Mango, A. parviflora (Small-flower, or Dwarf pawpaw)
Categories:
Native Plants, Poisonous Plants, Trees
Comment:

6-12 in. leaves have an unpleasant odor when crushed; yellow fall foliage; may form clumps from root sprouts; larva food for zebra swallowtail; native; difficult to transplant; best used along edges of property

Description:
Large shrub or small tree; leaves alternate, simple, widest above the middle; flowers with 6 maroon-purple petals; fruit an aromatic, soft and fleshy, cylindrical berry with large, flat, brown seeds
Height:
15-30 ft.
Flower:
Maroon flowers in early spring; 3-5 in., yellowish-green fruit ripens to dark brown with yellow pulp; taste similar to banana
Zones:
5-9
Habit:
Deciduous
Site:
Sun to partial shade; moist, well-drained soil
Texture:
Medium to coarse
Form:
Multi-stemmed with short trunk and spreading branches
Exposure:
Sun to partial shade; moist soil
Fruit:
Maroon flowers in early spring; 3 to 5 in. yellowish green fruit ripens to dark brown with yellow pulp
Family:
Annonaceae
Origin:
USA, NC
Distribution:
Throughout
Poison Part:
Fruit, leaves
Poison Delivery Mode:
Ingestion, dermatitis
Symptoms:
Fruit edible but some people suffer severe stomach and intestinal pain; skin irritation from handling fruit
Edibility:
Edible parts: raw berries (fruits) in small quantity. Harvest Time: only collect fruit from areas you know have NOT been treated with pesticides. Safe handling procedure: wash fruit thoroughly with warm water. Do not use dish detergent or any type of sanitizer, because these products can leave a residue. The fruits generally fall to the ground before they are ripe, and therefore must be ripened at home. Ripen outdoors, the smell is overpowering. The fruit is ripe when the skin turns brown. The fruit can be eaten raw, cutting them in half like an avocado, removing the large oblong seeds and sprinkling with lemon juice.
Toxic Principle:
Unknown
Severity:
CAUSES ONLY LOW TOXICITY IF EATEN. SKIN IRRITATION MINOR OR LASTING ONLY FOR A FEW MINUTES.
Found in:
Forest or natural area in rich, moist woods, along streams and river bottoms; often in dense thickets
Width:
15-20 ft.
Leaf:
6-12 in., alternate, simple leaves; has an unpleasant odor when crushed; yellow fall foliage
Tags:
deciduous

NCCES plant id: 445

Asimina triloba Asimina triloba young colony
Photo by Dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Asimina triloba Asimina triloba leaf detail
Photo by Dogtooth77, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Asimina triloba Asimina triloba blooms
Photo by Eric Hunt, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Asimina triloba A. triloba with fruit
Photo by Phillip Merritt, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Asimina triloba fall color
Tim Waters, CC BY-NC-ND - 2.0
Asimina triloba flower
Tom Potterfield, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Asimina triloba flower habit
Elizabeth Sellers , CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0
Asimina triloba fruit
Phillip Merit, CC BY-NC-SA - 2.0